Things to Consider When Moving to a New State

Posted in Moving Essentials,Planning the Move on October 4, 2021

People move constantly, and migration is a natural part of life. Many even tend to feel overwhelmed by being in one place for a while. However, relocation may sometimes seem like an answer when it’s not, which is why there are things to consider when moving to a new state before it happens.

Answer the 5 W’s (and 1 H) as Things to Consider When Moving to a New State

When the time to research how to move to a new state arrives, many of us tend to gloss over the vital questions and issues. That’s normal since people more often prefer to think about the good instead of the bad. However, before you go ahead and plan a move to another city, or take the creative freedom to compile a new apartment checklist, take a moment to consider the reasons and conditions for relocation.

With so many things to do before moving out of state, it’s understandable why someone would feel overwhelmed, decide to skip planning, and just do it. However, we often get stuck in a loop of dissatisfaction when we do stuff recklessly, which is why interstate relocation is one of the worst things an unhappy person could do (paired with bleaching their hair and impulse-buying a sports car.)

We may have a hack that could be relevant to the situation – try the analysis method of answering six fundamental questions, also known as the five W’s and one H. Those questions are:

  • Who?
  • What?
  • When?
  • Where?
  • Why?
  • How?

You should start with answering the question “Why?” to make sure your heart and mind are in the right place. The intention to relocate sometimes comes from dissatisfaction, so ask yourself – do you need to be moving across the country, or just a simple change of pace?

a young couple writing down reasons for moving across the country
You can write down answers to the six fundamental questions and continue adding to the list whenever another comes to mind

Why? – Do You Know Why You’re Relocating In the First Place?

Moving from one state to another requires time, patience, money, and organization. You’ll have to plan out a tight schedule and a relocation budget, so nothing goes wrong. The biggest question is, are you ready to do all that? If your reasons to move are strong enough, then it’s imperative to organize the move. If they’re not, everything else will feel sloppy and like it doesn’t belong in the process.

The common reasons for interstate relocating usually are:

  • Better work opportunities,
  • Cheaper rent and real estate,
  • Downsizing or upsizing,
  • Being closer to family and friends,
  • Making a romantic relationship work,
  • University or college,
  • More suitable lifestyles,
  • Safer environment.

You could also just desperately wish to move after a traumatic experience or pursue a lifelong dream to live a certain way. The reason for relocating is important, but how strong it is will determine if it should happen at all.

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Moving to Another State Doesn’t Have to Be Vital for Change

Moving cross-country can be a solution to many troubles, but if those troubles keep following you even afterward, then running from them is of no use. Last year, many of us wished to be in another place despite being impossible to relocate during the coronavirus. The quarantine period made everyone rethink their lives and lifestyles. So it’s no wonder that still, after one year, many of us feel lost and in need of transformation.

You can start preparing your home for sale and planning to move out if it feels like there’s something better waiting in a different place. However, it’s more than vital that the reason to relocate your entire family is solid and promises improvements afterward because if it doesn’t – that’s a lot of money, time, and trust at stake.

Hear out the young woman in the video below who moved from Los Angeles to Seattle. She speaks in detail about what impacted her decision and the benefits of relocating she noticed afterward.

Who? – Who Is Relocating and Are They Happy With the Decision?

For anyone moving out of state alone, the decision to do it falls only on them. One person can decide well enough for themselves unless they also need advice from family members or friends. For those who wish to move but have a partner, sibling or children depending on them, it could be harder to decide and let everyone know it’s happening.

Relocating with a newborn could make the process more complicated. There’s no telling how it might be with toddlers or grade school children running around, either. However, the younger the children are, the better they’ll handle relocation because they simply won’t remember it or have much to miss about the old place.

Choose the Best Options for Everyone’s Happiness

If you are moving out of state with a child or children, explain the benefits of relocating in a way that will be appealing. For example, talk about how they will have a room all to themselves if you’re upsizing, or how there will be many kids and pets to play with if you’re relocating to the suburbs or a family-friendly area.

If you aren’t relocating with pets but your children want one, why not keep them happy by thinking about it? Make sure that, if the plan is not to live on your own, everyone involved in the move sees it as beneficial and exciting.

a sad little girl sitting on a moving box in front of her parents, unhappy about long-distance moving
Don't let your kid stay disappointed in you for relocating away from their friends and school; make sure they feel safe and loved during the process, too.

What? – What Do You Need to Get Out of Relocating?

Some of the most common reasons for relocation are job opportunities. A career of your dreams can motivate you to research other options and believe it’s waiting to happen in a different place altogether.

If you get a job before you move, each of the five W’s will be answered. There’s reason enough to move; you’ll have a deadline, a home, and fresh work duties to perform. It seems like a lot could get resolved in this case, so we’d recommend job hunting before relocating to have a solid reason for doing it.

If the intention is to relocate and then try to get a job in another city, research areas where your professional skills are most wanted and narrow the search down. Because the question here is “what,” – as in what do you want out of this relocation? Going someplace where your work performance and efforts will be more appreciated is more than enough reason to start planning.

Budgeting vs Comfort

Another answer to what you’re looking for in relocation could be – an improved home situation. It’s important to take expenses into consideration, and if you’d rather rent or be a homeowner. If the plan is to relocate without a job, it’ll be much easier to rent unless there’s a crazy amount of money sitting in your account. In that case, no judgment; that’s pretty great.

Being in an expensive area can make anyone feel like they’re losing more than gaining. Expensive rent and higher cost of living never inspired anyone, and we get why your wallet needs a break. However, budgeting matters as long as the home is comfortable, too. Choosing budget over comfort can break the spirit. That’s why you can learn how to be smart about money and prioritize wellbeing all at once.

Comfort has different forms. It can be as easy as living in a smaller house alone, a bigger one with a couple of kids and a pet, not having the kitchen and living room in one space, and whatever else comes to mind when you imagine personal comfort. If the home is cozy, making friends in another town will come easier for everyone in the family.

a happy couple choosing their new house before moving cross-country
Forsaking comfort for budget's sake will turn out uncomfortable and less satisfying than before the move

When? – The Best Times to Consider Relocation (and Combine It With a Lower Cost)

The opportunity to move suddenly pops up, and it can be cheaper, easier, and faster than usual. However, there’s a big work project to finish before relocating, the kids are in school until the end of the week, and there’s no one to take care of the dogs. In this case, would you take the chance to move immediately or wait for the right time?

Many of us would likely choose to wait for the perfect moment to relocate, but so many others would still take the opportunity to start packing if it’s budget-friendly. This part is entirely up to you, but our tips are to wait for a better time and plan the cost entirely. There’s a reason why “Patience is a virtue” is a saying.

Some tips also suggest not to relocate during the holiday season, and others want you to know that relocating in the summer is the most expensive option out there. However, relocating in winter is not a walk in the park, either, but it might save you the most money out of all the options.

a father and daughter moving across the country during winter
A winter move isn't ideal, but it could make a tight budget work out well

Where? – Where Is the Best Location for Your Needs and Wants?

Of course, nothing’s better than being able to live someplace perfect. There could be more opportunities to live somewhere ideal if you move for love. Lots of places could still be at a distance that will allow you to keep in touch with friends and have every opportunity to grow mentally, physically, and emotionally.

It’s completely normal to want to move out because you’re unhappy with the surroundings. You are probably convinced that relocation is the right thing to do in that case, and all that’s left is to find long-distance movers to assist the move. However, leaving a toxic environment is best if you are level-headed because you’ll choose better when emotions aren’t running high.

Choosing a home near the water or mountains, supportive of an artistic or athletic lifestyle, and any other relevant criteria will help you feel better about relocating and as if you are finally right where you should be. If you aren’t sure which places support the lifestyle of your dreams, try doing a where should I move quiz to get some tips.

two girls hugging and standing on a beach after cross-country moving
Don't compromise on the most important factors for happiness, but ensure there's a lot that could bring joy

How? – How Will You Decide to Move Out? Movers vs DIY

Relocation mistakes tend to happen when we don’t create a checklist for moving out of state but instead freestyle everything as we go along. This is a sure way to have the move last longer and cost more. Even if it’s not your first rodeo, the process is still rather complex and requires patience. If you think the next one will be better because you’ll know what to do, think again.

You can relocate alone and enlist the help of family, friends, and neighbors. It may be less expensive in some parts, like packing, but in others, like car shipping, money may end up pouring out of your pockets without even understanding how or why.

Why Movers Are Better

How is it possible to have a stress-free relocation with so many things to do when you move to a new state? Firstly, you could do it with the help of cross-country movers if relocation can’t wait. They can do everything – from assisting with your stuff through packing services to giving you options and tips on efficiently using their storage units. There’s also no need to choose the right moment with movers because they’re always available.

The cost of movers could surprise you since relocation can turn out less expensive with professionals than DIY-ing it; that’s because cross-country moving services are thoroughly planned out before relocation day, and very little can go wrong. We hope these long-distance moving tips will help in answering how to relocate and have it pay off, too.

two cross-country movers standing in front of a long-distance moving truck
You'll have an easier relocation if you contact movers rather than settling into a new home by yourself

When Considering the Answers, Be Truthful and Honest

There’s a lot to do after relocating, but settling in and finally living the way you’ve always wanted is definitely on top of that list. Before the move, the best thing to do is find a balance between all factors and decide what to compromise. Once there are enough reasons to move, there shouldn’t be much stopping you from leaving.

Gemma Collins

Gemma is an NJ local that has explored all the US states, making her the perfect person to write about moving.