chinaware, tea set, china packing

How to Pack China for Moving – The Best Way to Avoid Damage

Posted in How-to on July 21, 2021

By Kaitlyn Bradley

Getting ready for a move implies boxing up the whole household, including all the delicate and breakable things. Glassware, tea sets, porcelain vases, and other decorations, as well as chinaware, will definitely take their place on the list. This time, we’re explaining in detail how to pack china for moving, revealing all the tips and tricks on how to properly do it and avoid any unpleasant surprises once your belongings get delivered to your new home.

What Is the Best Way to Pack Fine China for Moving?

Packaging fragile items is one of the most stressful tasks when boxing up your household since there is always a risk of damage due to their delicate nature. However, with the right techniques, a stress-free move without any fear that something will be delivered broken is possible. Here are all the essential steps you need to take to box up your fragile belongings properly.

Divide Your Breakables into Categories and Decide Whether You Need All of Them

Like with any other belongings, the very first step to boxing up breakables is related to deciding what to keep when relocating and what to get rid of. For that reason, taking all your fragile belongings off the kitchen cupboards and dividing them into categories is the best way to start boxing up dishes for a move. Set aside and separate different types of glasses, cups, mugs, plates, and chinaware and decide what will take place on the household inventory list.

When it comes to porcelain pieces, we are sure you won’t need too much time to decide what to bring with you since, in most cases, those are antique pieces of art and parts of a family heirloom, so they have sentimental value to you. Once you separate plates, bowls, cups, and vases, the next step is to group them by size and get organized for the move. If you want to learn more packing tips for relocating, check out the video below and find out everything you need to know.

Get All the Necessary Boxes and Packing Materials for China Dishes

Acquiring all protective materials for boxing up your chinaware is of utmost importance if you want to get your breakables whole once they are delivered to your doorstep. Ensure to have these protective materials before you start:

  • Boxes, plastic or cardboard,
  • Packing paper,
  • Bubble wrap,
  • Foam peanuts,
  • Cellular dividers,
  • Foam pouch inserts,
  • Tape.

Of course, we would definitely recommend getting some alternative materials you already have in the kitchen, like clothes, towels, or anything else that will cushion the inside of the cardboard and fill in the gaps between. You can also use some old newspapers instead of packaging paper. However, keep in mind that this kind of material could leave stains from the print. Whatever you decide, just ensure you’ve wrapped all the pieces correctly.

Using the Right Stuff: Don’t Use Second-Hand Moving Boxes for Fine China

If you want to ensure the full protection of your delicate items, avoid using already used cardboard boxes since those can get damaged easily. The best way to pack china is to use dish and glass kits – specially designed packages for fine chinaware pieces. They will keep breakables completely protected, and you can be sure that once they are packed in the relocation truck or storage unit, they’ll make it in one piece to your new home.

Don’t Skimp on Packing Paper and Bubble Wrap

Using paper and bubble wrap generously for delicate items is one of the best ways to protect them from any potential damage. When it comes to this part, be generous and make sure everything is wrapped up properly. This will provide additional cushioning inside the boxes, prevent movement during the transport, and add a level of protection once you store them in the storage unit.

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How Do You Pack China and Crystal for a Move?

Packing glasses for relocating entails a few preparatory steps. The first step is to establish a clear packaging station that has enough space. Getting the right china packing boxes and placing a thick layer of crumpled papers at the bottom of the cardboard is the second step.

Finally, taking each piece of chinaware and making sure to wrap it up with bubble wrap and packaging paper before you put it in the box is the most important step. Once you put all the pieces into boxes, ensure to fill in the gaps using foam peanuts, crumpled papers, or kitchen cloths and towels. And of course, last but not least, don’t forget to label the carton, because movers should know what each one contains in order to put it in the right place in the new home.

wrapped coffee mug in a bubble wrap for long-distance moving
Ensure every cup, mug, or glass is properly packed and labeled before it is loaded on the truck

How Do I Pack My China Plates for Moving?

Packing china plates when moving cross country is pretty similar to all other chinaware. Just ensure to wrap each piece separately and place them vertically this time. Also, make sure to arrange them according to their weight, and put the heavier items in the box first.

Again, lining up the box with cushioning materials is a must, so don’t forget this step. Although there will not be so many gaps between the items since plates are pretty flat, ensure to divide them with a piece of cardboard or cloth to prevent any movement and buffer vibrations during the transportation.

a woman wrapping up plates into bubble wrap, preparing for long-distance moving
Fold each plate separately and don't skimp on protective materials

Letting Professional Cross-Country Movers Do It for You Is Another Option

Moving across the country with the help of professional long-distance movers will not only facilitate your move but will also provide you with peace of mind knowing that none of your breakables will get damaged during the transportation process. So get specially designed packing services from your chosen moving service provider if you want to leave all the cross-country moving tasks to the pros.

Kaitlyn Bradley